Run and Jump Defense – Complete Coaching Guide

Run and Jump Defense

The ‘Run and Jump’ defense is a full-court man-to-man press with rules that encourage jump-switching and trapping. It was first created by Dean Smith at North Carolina during the 1970’s.

This full-court defense is best suited for a team of athletes that want to play an uptempo style game. Big and slow teams should avoid this offense as the rotations require quick movements to be effective.

The Four Roles at a Youth Basketball Game

Four roles youth basketball

We have a terrible problem in youth basketball. And it’s getting worse.

Here are three examples of it… (see if you can guess what it is).

1. Coaches are always screaming at referees about calls they disagree with.
2. Spectators are coaching kids from the sideline.
3. Players are constantly arguing with the referees.

While this might seem like 3 different problems, it’s really not.

They all come down to this…

The Shooting Superstars Program is LIVE!

Shooting Superstars

Hey Coaches, This is just a quick post to let you all know that the Shooting Superstars Program is now live! The Shooting Superstars program contains everything you need (seriously everything) to develop a team of knock-down shooters. I want to say a massive thank you to all the coaches that have been eagerly anticipating […]

Four Corners Offense – Complete Coaching Guide

Four Corners Offense

The four corners offense was invented by John McClendon in the mid-1950’s but was made popular to the masses by Dean Smith during his long tenure at North Carolina.

The four corners offense was most commonly used as a delay offense before a 45-second shot clock was introduced in the 1985/1986 season. In fact, offenses like this one are the main reason that the shot clock was introduced to the game of basketball.

The offense involves four players standing on all the four corners of the half-court and one player with the basketball in the middle.

6 Mistakes I Made My First Season Coaching Youth Basketball

6 Mistakes I Made My First Season Coaching Youth Basketball

My first year coaching youth basketball I had the privilege of coaching an under 12 boys basketball team that was made up of nine wonderful kids between the ages of 9 and 10.

Being my first time, I grew tremendously as a coach throughout the season. I was constantly being put into new, challenging situations that allowed me to gain more life and basketball coaching experience.

But, as much as I enjoyed it, the season definitely wasn’t the perfect start to my coaching career that I had initially hoped for…

Box and 1 Defense – Complete Coaching Guide

Box and 1 Defense

Do you ever come up against teams with a single dominant player? One player that scores a majority of their team’s points every game?

When you do come up against a team like that, it’s the perfect opportunity to implement the box and 1 defense.

The box and 1 defense is a junk defense commonly used against teams with one great offensive player surrounded by players of less offensive talent.

1-2-2 Zone Defense – Complete Coaching Guide

1-2-2 Zone Defense

The 1-2-2 zone defense is a variation of the more commonly used 2-3 zone.

The main difference is that the 1-2-2 zone defense is a great defense against teams that score a majority of their points from the perimeter, whereas the 2-3 zone provides more inside presence.

This is because, in the 1-2-2- zone, all 5 defenders have a responsibility to guard an area on the perimeter.

This allows quick closeouts and the ability to contest every shot taken from the three-point line.

Therefore, the 1-2-2 zone is often used against teams that have strong guards and three-point shooters but aren’t strong on the inside.

How to Beat a 2-3 Zone – 17 Strategies

how to beat a 2-3 zone

I want to preface this article with this statement: The 2-3 zone defense should not be allowed in youth basketball.

Instead of listing the reasons why in this article, I encourage you to check out Tyler Coston’s article on the subject which has most of them covered in my opinion.

The 2-3 zone is the most common zone used in the half-court. For better or worse, it’s used by teams of all ages at all levels. So it’s imperative that all coaches are prepared for when their team will face it.